Monday, November 10, 2014

Dim Sum Dinner Party

In November, Rebecca challenged us all to make Dim Sum.  It was a new experience for most of us, and turned out to be a really great dinner!






Rebecca made steamed Cha Siu Bao from Fine Cooking and Chinese broccoli with Oyster Sauce and Fried Garlic from seriouseats.com.



The Cha Siu Bao was a multi-step recipe, starting with the making of Chinese Barbecued Pork Roast.  The roast can be made up to 5 days before and chopped and frozen.  It was a very involved process, but none of the steps was very hard.

Chinese Barbecued Pork Roast

  • 1 (2-lb.) boneless pork loin roast
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup oyster sauce
  • 1/4 cup hoisin sauce
  • 3-1/2 Tbs. double dark soy sauce or double black soy sauce
  • 3-1/2 Tbs. light soy sauce
  • 3 Tbs. Shaoxing (Chinese rice wine) or dry sherry
  • 1-1/4 tsp. five-spice powder
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground white pepper
Cut the pork loin lengthwise into 4 equal strips. Using a small knife, pierce each strip 4 times to help the marinade penetrate the meat. Put the pork in a shallow bowl.

Combine the honey, oyster sauce, hoisin sauce, double dark soy sauce, light soy sauce, Shaoxing, five-spice powder, 1/2 tsp. salt, and a pinch of white pepper in a small bowl and pour over the meat to coat well. Refrigerate for at least 8 hours or overnight.

Position a rack in the top third of the oven and heat the oven to 450°F. Line a small heavy-duty rimmed baking sheet with heavy-duty foil. Put the meat on the baking sheet and spoon some of the marinade over it. Roast until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the middle of the pork registers 165°F, 30 to 40 minutes. During cooking, baste the meat with the juice from the pan and flip it 4 times.

Position an oven rack about 4 inches from the broiler and heat the broiler on high. Broil the pork until it’s slightly charred in places, about 2 minutes.

Cha Siu Bao (Steamed Pork Buns)

For the filling
  • 1/2 cup lower-salt chicken broth
  • 2 Tbs. oyster sauce
  • 2 Tbs. ketchup
  • 5 tsp. granulated sugar
  • 4 tsp. cornstarch
  • 1 Tbs. dark soy sauce 
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground white pepper
  • 1 recipe Chinese Barbecued Roast Pork
  • 2 Tbs. peanut oil
  • 1 small yellow onion, cut into 1/4-inch dice (1/2 cup)
  • 1 Tbs. Shaoxing (Chinese rice wine) or dry sherry
  • 1-1/2 tsp. Asian sesame oil
For the dough
  • 10-1/8 oz. (2-1/4 cups) bleached all-purpose flour, preferably Gold Medal; more as needed
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 3-1/2 tsp. baking powder
  • 6 Tbs. whole milk, at room temperature
  • 2 Tbs. melted lard or peanut oil
Make the filling
In a medium bowl, stir or whisk the broth, oyster sauce, ketchup, sugar, cornstarch, soy sauce, 1/2 tsp. salt, and a pinch of pepper. Finely dice enough of the barbecued roast pork to yield 1-1/2 cups (about 6 oz.). Heat a wok over high heat for 30 seconds. Add the peanut oil and swirl to coat. When a wisp of white smoke appears, in about 30 seconds, add the onion. Reduce the heat to medium low and cook, stirring often, until golden-brown, about 6 minutes.

Add the pork, increase the heat to high, and stir-fry to combine, 2 to 3 minutes. Drizzle the wine from the edge of the wok into the pork mixture and stir well. Reduce the heat to medium.

Make a well in the center of the mixture and pour in the sauce. Stir until the mixture thickens, about 3 minutes. Add the sesame oil and mix well. Refrigerate until cool.
Make the dough
Mix the flour, sugar, and baking powder on a clean work surface and make a well in the center. While slowly pouring the milk into the well, use your fingers in a circular motion to pull the flour mixture into the milk until it’s absorbed. Make another well, add 3 Tbs. room-temperature water, and continue to use your fingers to work the dough. Add the lard or peanut oil and, using your fingers and a dough scraper or bench knife, work the dough until thoroughly combined.

Gather the dough with the dough scraper in one hand and begin kneading with the other. Knead the dough for 10 to 12 minutes—it should feel smooth, pliable, elastic, and slightly tacky to the touch. If the dough is too sticky to work with, sprinkle a little flour on the work surface and your hands as you knead it. If the dough feels dry, lightly wet your hands with water and continue kneading. When the dough is smooth and elastic, shape it into a ball, cover with a slightly damp cloth, and let rest at room temperature for about 1 hour. (The dough must be used within 2 hours of the time it was made. It cannot be frozen.)
Portion the dough
Have ready sixteen 2-1/2-inch squares of parchment or waxed paper.

Lightly flour a work surface. Roll the prepared dough into a 16-inch-long log. Cut the log into 16 equal pieces and then roll each piece into a ball. Cover the dough with the damp cloth.
Make the buns
Working with one piece at a time, shape a dough ball into a cup that’s about 1-1/2 inches deep and about 3 inches in diameter. The sides of the dough cup should be thinner than the bottom. Hold the dough cup in one hand and spoon about 1 Tbs. of the pork filling into the center. Gather the edges of the dough and pull them up and over the filling, using your thumb to push the filling down as you pleat with your fingers to cover the filling. It may seem like a tight fit at first, but the dough will stretch as you pull it around the filling. Twist the top to seal the bun and pinch off any excess dough. Put the bun, knot side up, on a parchment square and set aside. As you gain confidence, you may use 1-1/2 Tbs. of filling in subsequent buns. Repeat until 16 buns have been made, cleaning off your thumb on a damp cloth after making each bun.

Divide the buns (still on their parchment squares) equally between 2 bamboo steamers, spacing the buns at least 2 inches apart. Stack the steamers on top of each other and cover.

In a wok, bring 6 cups of water to a boil over high heat. Set the stacked steamers over the boiling water and steam the buns until they look fluffy and their tops have opened like flowers to slightly reveal the filling, 15 to 20 minutes. Remove the steamers from the wok, put them on platters and serve the buns immediately, straight from the steamers.
Make Ahead Tips
The filling may be made up to 1 day ahead; keep refrigerated and do not freeze. Cooked buns will keep in an airtight container for 3 to 4 days in the refrigerator or 4 to 6 weeks in the freezer. To reheat: If frozen, let the buns thaw and come to room temperature; if refrigerated, let them come to room temperature. Then steam the buns in bamboo steamers until very hot, 5 to 7 minutes.


Chinese Broccoli with Oyster Sauce and Fried Garlic

  • 1 whole head of garlic, peeled
  • Kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup vegetable, peanut, or canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce
  • 10 ounces of Chinese broccoli
Transfer garlic to the bowl of a food processor or mini food processor. Pulse until garlic is very finely chopped but not a paste, about 12 short pulses, scraping down sides as necessary. Add 1/4 teaspoon salt and toss to combine.

Set a fine mesh strainer over a heat-proof bowl. Heat 1/4 cup of oil in a small saucepan over medium heat until shimmering. Add garlic and cook, stirring. Garlic should maintain a very gently bubble. If bubbling vigorously, reduce heat. Cook, stirring constantly, until garlic is pale golden brown, 6 to 8 minutes, then immediately strain (do not overcook, garlic will continue to darken as it rests). Transfer garlic to a paper towel-lined plate to cool. Reserve fried garlic and oil separately.


In a small bowl combine 1 teaspoon of reserved garlic oil, sesame oil, and the oyster sauce. Mix well until combined and then add 1 tablespoon hot water. Stir and set aside. Reserve remaining garlic oil for another use.


Bring a large pot of water to boil. Add the Chinese broccoli and until just tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Drain really well on paper towels or in a salad spinner and place on a serving platter. Drizzle the mixed oyster sauce on top and sprinkle with the fried garlic. Serve immediately.



Dani made Soup Dumplings and green onion pancakes.







Lauren made Chicken and Rice wrapped in Lotus leaves and Har gau.





Katharina made Spring Rolls.




Kim made dessert - Sesame balls with fig filling and coconut rice bars.